Enjoy these Creating Active Champions activities!

Hello! Welcome to our Creating Active Champions games page. Each weekday during our Creating Active Champions program from July 6 to August 21, 2020, we will post a new game or puzzle. The newest game will be at the top of this page each day and if you missed a day, you can just scroll down to find it.

We invite you to join us on Facebook (www.facebook.com/SaskSportsHF) at 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. to take part in the fun of Creating Active Champions!

For July 22, please visit this web site to enjoy some great cycling resources for you and your family.

For the Creating Active Champions activity for Monday, July 20 please visit this web site about the 5BX.

Saskatchewan Sports Stories: Lynn Kanuka (Williams)

Lynn Kanuka remembers sprinting up and down a hill made out of garbage in Regina in the dead of winter until she was exhausted.

Unorthodox as it may have been, it typifies Kanuka’s grit and inner strength that helped her find a late surge that propelled her onto the medal podium. Competing under her married name of Lynn Williams, she won an Olympic bronze medal in the women’s 3,000-metre run in 1984 and a gold medal at the 1986 Commonwealth Games.

“I’m tough and tenacious. I’ve been described as the petite, little tenacious girl,” Kanuka said with a laugh.

“I was small and stocky and no one would have looked at me and said ‘you’re going to be an Olympic runner.’ Nobody would have said that. No way. But my engine is strong, I think – my aerobic engine and my work ethic. Certainly, there’s a talent factor that got fine-tuned over the years, but I was fortunate to have really wonderful people as supporters – first of all my family and then these great coaches that helped me along.”

Lynn Kanuka

An active multi-sport athlete who had been a competitive swimmer, Kanuka decided to start running on her own down Wascana Parkway near the University of Regina (U of R) when she was 16.

“I wanted to do something for myself. It wasn’t about sport, it was about fitness. For whatever reason, I decided I would bundle up and run out to the university and back. It was wintertime. It was cold. I didn’t have running technical clothes or anything. My friends thought I was nuts. People weren’t really doing that – and certainly not 16-year-old teenagers,” Kanuka said.

She said she had great “fun-loving prairie parents” who were supportive and threw her into sports to keep her out of trouble. Her father had been an athlete, but still, she was surprised when he saw her going out for a run and offered to go with her.

“That was pivotal,” she said. “He could have said ‘why are you going to do that, it’s -30C outside’ or ‘you should be helping your mother make dinner in the kitchen.’ He could have said that, but instead he said ‘well wait a minute and I’ll come with you.’

“He huffed and puffed and we got all the way out there and I was about to turn around and go back. There’s that garbage dump hill out there, covered in snow and he said ‘we’re all the way out here, why don’t you run up and down that hill a few times.’ I never argued with him and now I was huffing and puffing. I loved it. I loved working hard. It felt good to move and breathe and have my heart-rate go up. And that was probably my first running interval session.”

She had run track, but in her senior year at Regina LeBoldus, she decided to run cross country instead of playing volleyball and won the high school provincial title. After high school, she trained in Regina under the guidance of coach Larry Longmore at the Wheat City Kinsmen Track Club. She competed at the 1977 Canada Games in St. John’s, NL and also attended the Legion Track Championships as she got her first taste of national-level competition.

“Those things are very pivotal and they nudge, nudge, nudge you along with more experience,” Kanuka said. “Along the way you have these people – if you’re lucky like I was – who also nudge you along and that little voice in your head tells you you’re on the right path.”

After two years at the U of R – which did not have a track program at the time – Longmore encouraged her to transfer to the University of Saskatchewan to work with Huskies track coach Lyle Sanderson (himself a Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame inductee in 1994).

“Lyle was a great coach and mentor and father of fun I would say,” Kanuka said. “He was coaching Diane Jones Konihowski and they had quite the program there over all of those years and so that seemed like a good idea to me. That was a pivotal year. It was only one year, but it felt so much longer.

“Things are so different now. We had a gym, a regular gym, and we would have a full track team practice going on in there. Lyle arranged for the construction of wooden corners…  It was small, small quarters, but everything was so well organized and orchestrated. Now, of course, there’s a field house. There are good things about having facilities, but there were many good things that happened when we were tough and close and resilient in those days and in those conditions.”

While she had been focused on attending medical school in Saskatoon, Kanuka made the national cross country team and won a university championship and Sanderson suggested she could get a college scholarship in the United States.

“I still wasn’t committed really. I didn’t understand what I could maybe achieve at that stage. I was just going along with it. At that point, I didn’t really have an Olympic dream,” Kanuka said.

She went to the library and sent letters to all of the warm-weather universities that “seemed like they would be cool places to go to” and settled on a scholarship to San Diego State. There she competed in a number of distances from the 800m to the 10,000m and was often injured.

“I had a wonderful experience down there, but there were challenges. I ran injured a lot. Every summer I never had a Canadian track season because I had to run so much,” Kanuka said.

Lynn Kanuka competing at the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics.

Kanuka made her IAAF World Cross Country Championship debut in 1979 and competed there for four straight years. However, she didn’t make her outdoor debut internationally until 1983. At the ’83 IAAF World Championships, she finished 10th in the 3,000m but ran the same time – eight minutes, 50.20 seconds – as the ninth-place finisher.  American Mary Decker won the race and West German Brigitte Kraus was second ahead of a pair of runners from the Soviet Union, including three-time gold medalist Tatyana Kazankina.

Having married fellow 1984 Olympian Paul Williams in 1983, she had almost considered her running career over.

“I was finished, I thought,” she said. “I was injured again and I thought I would go apply for med school. He said ‘Lynn, you never really got to be who you could be as a runner because of all of the racing and the injuries.’ He said ‘give it one more year and focus on the Olympic trials and see if you can make the Olympic team.’ That’s when a light went on for me. I thought I’ve been doing this for so long now, why don’t I focus on this and see what happens?”

Kanuka qualified for the Olympic team and she would compete in the first women’s 3,000m in the Olympics. It would be one of the marquee events of the Games.

After winning two gold medals at the IAAF worlds, Decker had been named Sports Illustrated’s Sportswoman of the Year – only the second time in 30 years that a woman had won the honour alone. Decker made her international debut at 15 – sporting braces and pigtails and weighing 89 pounds – and endeared herself to the American public by throwing a baton at a Soviet runner who cut her off during an indoor race in Moscow.  She had broken seven world records by the time she made her Olympic debut in 1984.

While the Eastern Bloc boycott meant that the top Soviet runners would not be present, there was some controversy about one runner who would be at the Games. Zola Budd was an 18-year-old South African runner who competed barefoot. With sanctions placed on South Africa due to their government’s apartheid policy, Budd had rarely competed internationally. However, she opened some eyes when she unofficially broke the world record in the 3,000m at a race in South Africa. That spurred an English tabloid to note that she had a British grandparent and champion her cause. Budd received her British citizenship in short order and not without some controversy.

Lynn Kanuka poses with her bronze medal from the 1984 Olympic Games.

Budd wasn’t the only runner posting great times. At Swangard Stadium in Burnaby, B.C., the Canadian team was preparing for the Games and Kanuka ran the fastest time in the world in a time trial. The world record can only fall in an official competition, but still, the time she posted was valuable three weeks before the Games.

“We were so excited. We celebrated. ‘Oh my God, you’re so ready!’ I knew that I could run with anybody that was going to be there. So I was very excited. Nobody was looking at me and I knew I could be in that final,” Kanuka said.

Before the Games, the Canadian middle-distance runners trained together in Lynn’s old stomping grounds of San Diego. She qualified in second place in her heat, behind Decker who won in Olympic record time.

“Dieticians don’t like it when I tell this story, but the night before  I went out for dinner with one of my coach/mentors – Dr. Jack Taunton, he was a pioneer in the world of sport medicine – and for my last supper before the Olympic final we had pizza and a beer together,” Kanuka said. “Good prairie girl… we used to always have a Friday night beer and pizza night, so that was really familiar. It was a beautiful evening and I said ‘well Dr. Jack, I’m ready. There’s no reason not to go out there and run my heart out.’”

Thelma Wright, herself a former Olympic runner, was coaching Kanuka in Vancouver. Wright would give birth to a future Olympian during the Games back in Canada.

“She was great for me and in fact, I broke her (Canadian) records in the 800 and 3k, so that was really cool,” Kanuka said. “The day before the final she sent me a telegram: ‘Lynn, your godson Anthony Madison Wright came out fighting today and that’s what you need to do tomorrow.’”

With some inspiring words from her coach, a blazing training time fresh in her mind, and at ease in Southern California, the stars aligned well for her Olympic debut.

“I was nervous. There was so much hype, but I was ready. It helps when you’re ready. At least I had gone to the worlds in ’83, so that helped,” Kanuka said. “For me, I was a relatively unknown Canadian. Certainly, no one was focusing on me to win a medal.”

As it happened, the women’s 3,000m would not only live up to any pre-race hype, but it would go down as one of the most memorable races in Olympic history. Kanuka’s fighting spirit would hold her in good stead.

“On the day, what a crazy race that was, just crazy,” Kanuka said. “My plan was to tuck in the middle. It was going to be predictable that Mary Decker and Zola Budd were going to vie for the lead. They’re both front-runners. They like to lead. That’s how they are. But there’s danger in that. The track is narrow and only one person can be in front. I thought they would set the pace and I would tuck in there.

“I have what we call ‘good turnover.’ I’m small, but I can get my legs going quicker, so I get the jump on people and I can pass quicker and hopefully, they can’t react. That was always a strategy of mine.

“It was so bumpy and jostly and it was very fast. It was a world record pace the first few laps. We were working really hard and I was getting bumped around. You can’t really see it on TV, but it was not easy going.”

Kanuka settled in on the inside lane and sat in fifth or sixth throughout the opening laps. After four laps, Budd inched into a lead and with Decker on her heels, the pair collided and Decker fell into the infield having injured her right leg. Decker would contend that the inexperienced Budd had cut inside too quickly after her pass. Budd would be initially disqualified after the race for obstruction, only to have her result reinstated an hour later after a review of the tape. The incident would be debated for years, but at that moment the 93,000 people in the Los Angeles Coliseum voiced their shock and displeasure at seeing Decker hit the ground.

“I saw they bumped and then boom, Mary goes down. We all had to do a dipsy-doodle and avoid the collision, Kanuka said.

A lap earlier American Joan Hansen had collided with New Zealand’s Dianne Rodger and fell, but got up to finish the race. Behind Kanuka, Brigitte Kraus – the world championship silver medalist – had also hit the ground.

“When we came around there’s Brigitte down and I assumed – I think as we all did – that Mary went down, but she would get up and rejoin the pack somehow. Then there she is, still down as we do another lap and then you’re thinking ‘my God, Mary Decker is out’ and I remember the crowd – it started with this great roar – and now they’re booing like there was foul play,” Kanuka said.

Decker and Kraus would not finish the race.

Budd, Britain’s Wendy Sly and Romanian Maricica Puică were bunched with Decker when she fell and had broken away from the rest of the field.

“We all lost focus. It went from being in a pack to everyone being spread out around the track,” Kanuka said. “There were literally a couple of laps where I remember nothing. I just remember running in this weird vacuum and hearing all of this booing. Then I woke up. I heard the bell and it was ‘holy crap, it’s the last lap, wake up!’

“I looked and I’m in fourth and I could see that Zola Budd was coming back. The bear had jumped on her back. If anybody lost focus, she probably did. She had no gas. I thought ‘if I can go by her I’ll be in medal contention.’”

As Budd faded, Kanuka surged, catching her on the final backstretch.

“I passed her and now I was really running. I was racing for my life, but I knew that everybody else was waking up too. I could hear them,” Kanuka said.

Puică had more in the tank than Sly and won comfortably with Kanuka claiming the bronze medal in a time of 8:42.14.

Lynn Kanuka wave to the crowd from the medal podium in Los Angeles.

“It was an amazing day,” Kanuka said.

“It was a great race, but it was not my best race. It was just the one that got the most attention. I was a much better, stronger, seasoned, experienced athlete in the years following.”

Two years later, on a cold, windy day in Scotland, Sly would enter the Commonwealth Games as the favourite alongside Scottish runner Yvonne Murray. Two years on, Kanuka was definitely not flying under the radar anymore.

“That was probably one of my favourite strategic races because it was super cold and windy,” Kanuka said. “Yvonne and Wendy are taller than I am and Yvonne likes to lead, so being small I was going to tuck in, but no one wanted to lead that race because it was so windy.

“For four laps it was painfully slow. I knew I had the gears and I would have to go at some point, but I was hoping someone else would go and I could match it and then I would go with 500 metres left and see if anyone could stay with me and keep something in reserve and bust out in the final turn. That was my plan and it really worked.”

When Murray broke from the pack, Kanuka took her time reeling her in and then stuck with her. Kanuka tried to kick with 500 metres left, but Murray matched her late surge and passed Kanuka with 300 metres remaining.

“I remember thinking ‘come on Lynn, you can catch her.’ With 150 to go off the turn, I bust out and passed her and she couldn’t match it and that was it,” Kanuka said. “That was a great one. That was one of my favourite races.”

Kanuka returned to the Olympics in Seoul, South Korea in 1988. She opened the Games with a disappointing eighth-place run in the 3,000m but finished her Olympic career with a strong fifth-place finish in the 1,500m.

Between those two races, Canadian sprinter Ben Johnson failed a drug test, was stripped of his gold medal in the 100m and created a major distraction within the Canadian delegation and the track team.

“I personally had one of my best races in the 1,500, but of course the Ben Johnson scandal happened and that was awful afterward,” Kanuka said. “I ran my best time. I finished fifth, but it was a crazy race too.”

Kanuka had grown to prefer the 1,500m and finished in a time of four minutes and 86/100ths of a second. She was 62/100ths of a second out of second place in a frenzied finish.

“That’s how close it was,” Kanuka said. “That was a really great race. That was one of my best races ever, for sure.”

Romanian Paula Ivan won the 1,500m in an Olympic record time of 3:53.96 that still stands in a dominating performance. Two Soviet runners rounded out the medals.

Four women’s running world records and four more Olympic records still stand from the 1980s. Those times have done little to quell the suspicions of drug use that surrounded the era even before Johnson’s positive test.

“There were others in our midst as well who were dabbling in that world of performance enhancements. There were rumours flying around and scandalous things that were happening,” Kanuka said. “I didn’t really focus on that.

“I just tried to beat them. That’s the name of the game, get to the line first. Was it frustrating – if I really get going on it? Yeah, for sure, but I’m a cup-half-full kind of gal. Why focus on that? It’s just negative.”

Lynn Kanuka, left, coaching Canadian Olympian Nathasha Wodak.

Kanuka makes her home in White Rock, B.C. where she has four children and coaches Canadian Olympian Natasha Wodak, the Canadian record-holder in the 10,000m, amongst others. While she does coach elite athletes, Kanuka believes “movement is medicine” and is just as passionate about inspiring people to be more active.

“That’s really become my passion. I love helping people take steps to better health and enjoy the sport I love,” she said.

“I’ve worked a long time now – a dozen years or more – with our Indigenous population out here in B.C. When I first started we had three leaders that I trained to coach and lead the running and walking programs. Now from three leaders in one tiny training session, we now have five regional leader training events and we train at least 100 leaders every year and over 2,000-plus people who are mobilized in running and walking programs. This is not about performance, it’s about personal well-being and the kind of wheel of health that we know exists, we just have to tap into it.”

Glenn Hall

Saskatchewan Sport Stories: Glenn Hall

There aren’t many unbreakable records in the world of sports.

Glenn Hall, however, surely owns one of them.

The Humboldt-born goaltender played every game of a National Hockey League season seven seasons in a row. His streak of 502 regular games played by a goalie will never be equalled.

“I went back to junior hockey and my five years in the minors and I believe it was a 1,026-game streak by my count,” Hall said from his home in May of 2020.

Glenn Hall

Glenn Hall during his time with the Chicago Black Hawks.
Photo Courtesy : Hockey Hall Of Fame

Hall’s NHL streak ran from October 6, 1955 thru November 7, 1962 when a back issue forced him out of the net in the middle of the first period. The streak extends to 552 consecutive games if you count playoff games.

So what makes Hall’s record streak so insurmountable? The last time any goalie played every game in an NHL season was Detroit’s Roger Crozier in 1964-65. It is almost unthinkable that a goalie would appear in each of his team’s games in the modern era — to say nothing of doing so repeatedly for more than seven years.

Hall’s streak was partly based out of necessity. For most of the Original Six era in the NHL, teams only carried one goalie on their roster.

“In a one goalkeeper system, you played even if you were hurting a little bit. Most of our injuries were puck-related,” Hall said. “I’m sure I was like any goalie, I enjoyed playing.”

Not having a back-up is, of course, not the most notable anachronism of the Original Six era when it came to NHL goalies. Hall, like nearly all of his contemporaries, tended goal without a mask for the duration of his streak and nearly his entire 18-season NHL career.

“The people who played before us, they played without a mask, so we felt that we could too,” said Hall who donned a mask for the first time in 1968, his second season in St. Louis and 15th full season in the NHL. “I’ve had a bunch of little nicks, but I got hit hard three times. If you get hit up (by a puck) in the forehead they don’t hurt like they do around the nose or the mouth. Those are the ones that really hurt. Our big concern was the eye injury. There were a lot of kids who had to quit playing goal because of an eye injury. You felt lucky that you got out of the game with both eyes.”

It wasn’t just that Hall was durable, he also maintained an incredible standard of excellence during his career that earned him the nickname Mr. Goalie. He was named a first-team all-star a record seven times and holds the record for most all-star game appearances by a goalie with 13. That is even more impressive when you consider that five of his contemporaries during the 1960s — Johnny Bower, Eddie Giacomin, Jacques Plante, Terry Sawchuk and Gump Worsley — have all joined Hall as members of the Hockey Hall of Fame.

While Plante is well-known for being the first goalie to wear a mask in the NHL, Hall was an innovator in his own right. He brought the “butterfly style” of goaltending to the NHL. Now the standard style young goalies are taught growing up, Hall’s penchant for dropping to his knees and covering the bottom part of the net was not well received.

“I caught heck for playing like that,” Hall said. “We were taught by people who had never played goal. They would tell you that you’ve got to stand up and you’ve got to do this and you’ve got to do that. And they had no idea how to play goal.

“They didn’t want me to play that way, but I knew if I could see the puck, I had a pretty good chance of stopping it,” added Hall who was noted for having incredible vision on the ice. “I could see the puck from down there and I found I could cover the four corners. I did what I had to do. I used to stand on my tip-toes to look over people too, as well as look underneath them. (The butterfly style) was just to see the puck. If you could see the puck you were in good shape.”

Glenn Hall

Glenn Hall tending goal with the Chicago Black Hawks in action against the Toronto Maple Leafs.

Hall won a Stanley Cup with Detroit in 1952 as the Red Wings spare goalie before he had made his NHL debut. In 1955 he was tasked with replacing Sawchuk in Detroit and won the Calder Trophy as the NHL’s rookie of the year. After four years in Detroit, he moved to Chicago and spent 10 years with the Black Hawks, winning the Stanley Cup in 1961. He would finish his career by playing four seasons in St. Louis.

In 1968, Hall won the Conn Smythe Trophy with the expansion St. Louis Blues. He is one of only five players to have ever won the Conn Smythe Trophy as the most valuable player in the playoffs while not winning the Stanley Cup.

Hall would go on to share his knowledge as a goaltender coach with the Calgary Flames and won a Stanley Cup ring in that role in 1989.

Before reaching the NHL for good in 1955, Hall played in the minor-professional Western Hockey League (not to be confused with the current major junior league of the same name) with the Edmonton Flyers. He and his wife Pauline settled in the area as Hall found off-season work in Alberta.

“We squirrelled away nickels and dimes to buy a little land,” Hall said. “I used to spend the summers at my grandparent’s farm and I loved the farm. Pauline came from a farm herself, so that’s what we wanted. We were very happy when we settled down here.”

Hall, 88, is keeping in touch with loved ones through the phone during the COVID-19 pandemic. His wife passed in 2009 and while there are no animals to tend to on the farm, he has always enjoyed bird-watching.

“I’ve got a couple of golf carts and I drive around and look at the birds. I’ve got a goose nesting about 50 feet from the house. She keeps me a little land-locked. I don’t want to disturb her. I enjoy seeing them and I enjoy seeing the goslings,” he said. “I’m very comfortable here. I’m the boss. I don’t have a dog or a cat, but even if I had a goldfish I would be second in command.”

Hall’s self-deprecating humour aside, he was rarely second in anything in his career.

Hall was the only player to be named a first-team all-star selection with three different teams in any major North American sport. Even since his retirement, that feat has only been matched by National Football League star Deion Sanders.

So with all of the records and accolades, what was Hall’s best memory from his playing career? Hall’s reply was profound in its simplicity.

“Oh, just stopping the puck,” Hall said.

Glenn Hall was inducted into the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame in 1991.

Kid’s Corner educational resources

Welcome to our Kid’s Corner educational resource.

Here you will find sports-themed word searches, colouring pages, math games, and puzzles for younger students. We also have some crossword puzzles and our Create Your Own Hockey Team game for older students.

We hope to add more content geared towards our younger sports enthusiasts and when we do we will add them to this page.

New board elected for Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

 The membership of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame (SSHF) approved a new Board of Directors during the SSHF’s 2019-20 Annual General Meeting.

 

Following the meeting, Robb Elchuk began his term as SSHF President. Rankin Jaworski now moves into the non-elected position of Past President following his two terms as President.

 

Kevin Dureau assumes the role of Vice President, while Mike Babcock remains Treasurer and will also serve as Secretary.

 

Trent Blezy was elected to his first term on the Board, while Samer Awadh and Laurel Garven were each re-elected to another term.

 

Trent was born and raised in the southeastern part of the province and lives in White City. He works with the Ministry of Energy and Resources for the Government of Saskatchewan.  

 

As a volunteer, Trent has worked in fundraising capacities to support the Saskatchewan Children’s Hospital Foundation and has held several positions with various Constituency Associations through the Conservative Party and the Saskatchewan Party. 

 

Sports have always been and always will be a part of Trent’s life. He believes sports have a tremendous ability to bring people together, evoking an emotional response in people unlike other activities can. He looks forward to the opportunity of being a part of an organization involved with and celebrating those who elicit that emotional connection.

 

Linda Burnham, a two-time SSHF Inductee herself, is stepping off the board after three elected terms and two more years as Past President. Don Gallo and Nathan Morrison both completed their second term on the board and did not stand for re-election.

Minutes from the SSHF’s 2019-20 Annual General Meeting are available here.

 

The 2020-21 SSHF Board of Directors:

 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

President – Robb Elchuk (Regina)

Vice President – Kevin Dureau (Regina)

Treasurer – Mike Babcock (Regina)

Secretary – Mike Babcock (Regina)

Past President – Rankin Jaworski (Regina)

 

DIRECTORS

Samer Awadh (Regina)

Trent Blezy (White City)

Lori Ebbesen (Saskatoon)

Laurel Garven (Regina)

Tennille Grimeau (Saskatoon)

Kelvin Ostapowich (Regina)

Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame moves 2020 Induction to 2021

The Board of Directors of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame (SSHF) has made the difficult decision to cancel the 2020 Induction Dinner & Ceremony scheduled for Saturday, September 26, 2020, due to health and safety concerns associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. The 2020 Induction Class will be carried forward as the Class of 2021. Their induction is now scheduled to occur in September 2021.

The SSHF has been closely monitoring developments since social distancing protocols were put in place by the Government of Saskatchewan in March. The health and welfare of our inductees, their families and friends, patrons, staff, volunteers and suppliers remains front of mind. Given the continued uncertainty relating to when groups could gather safely and without restriction, the SSHF and its Board of Directors felt this cancelation was the most prudent course of action.

In arriving at this decision serious consideration was given to other creative means to honour our 2020 Class virtually to adhere to social distancing measures. Ultimately, the decision to cancel was made based on our concern for what would be best for our inductees. By delaying a year, the SSHF wanted to ensure that their induction night would be an opportunity to come together with family, friends, teammates and the Saskatchewan sporting community to celebrate their accomplishments.

In addition to moving the Class of 2020 forward, any nominees still under consideration will retain an extra year of eligibility. Our nomination deadline is October 31, 2021 and we encourage anyone who has an athlete, team or builder that they feel is worthy of inclusion in the Hall of Fame to please take the time to nominate them.

The Class of 2021 will be unveiled at a later date.

Update on the status of satellite halls of fame across the province

The Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame and its administrative offices are closed in response to the coronavirus pandemic.

Here is an update on the status of the 11 satellite halls located throughout the province:

Humboldt & District Sports Hall of Fame (closed to the public until April 30)

Moose Jaw & District Sports Hall of Fame (Mosaic Place is closed to the public indefinitely)

North Battleford Sports Museum and Hall of Fame (closed until further notice)

Prince Albert Sports Hall of Fame (the Art Hauser Centre is closed to the public indefinitely.) Please visit their web site

Regina Sports Hall of Fame (The Cooperators Centre in Evraz Park is closed to the public indefinitely.) Please visit their web site

Saskatchewan Baseball Hall of Fame (the museum is closed to the public, but their office is still being staffed)

Saskatchewan Golf Hall of Fame (Sask Sport building is closed to the public.) Please visit their web site

Saskatoon Sports Hall of Fame (closed until the City of Saskatoon facilities they are located in re-open.) Please visit their web site

Ted Knight Saskatchewan Hockey Hall of Fame (closed to the public.) Please visit their web site

Turner Curling Museum, Weyburn (all City of Weyburn facilities are closed to the public indefinitely)

Yorkton and District Sports Hall of Fame (The Gallagher Centre is closed and all meetings specific to their organizational restructuring are postponed until further notice)

Information on our COVID-19 Response

Information on our COVID-19 Response
March 16, 2020
The Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame (SSHF) exhibit galleries have been closed for the past few weeks in order to undergo some renovations. During this time we have kept our administrative offices open and conducted education programing on an outreach basis.
Due to the unprecedented circumstances resulting from the coronavirus pandemic, effective immediately all outreach education programing will be suspended until April 14, 2020. Additionally, our administration offices will be closed to the public effective immediately. The SSHF staff has been authorized to begin working remotely at their discretion. Staff will remain available via their personal emails and general requests or questions can be sent to [email protected]
The SSHF management will continue to monitor the COVID-19 situation via public health authorities and relevant updates will be posted to our website, www.sasksportshalloffame.com.

SSHF closed for renovations and upgrades

A new look is on its way

With the new year comes a new look for the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame (SSHF). After Play Hard, Fight Hard: Sport and the Canadian Military finished its run Saturday, the Hall of Fame galleries have closed so that this exhibit can be packed up and sent off to its next destination.

Once Play Hard, Fight Hard is shipped, the SSHF galleries will undergo some significant renovations. We will be sharing some “sneak peaks” on our social media channels as we go through the process.

We look forward to sharing our new look and our fully redesigned third gallery when we re-open in April.

Our administration offices will remain open during this time.

The Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame will be closed as we pack up Play Hard, Fight Hard and undergo significant upgrades to our galleries.

See us at YQR

While the SSHF galleries are closed we will be getting our collection out in the public. Ahead of the Scotties Tournament of Hearts national curling championships in Moose Jaw, the SSHF has a display set up at the Regina International Airport. A display case in the airport is currently featuring some of our curling artifacts until the conclusion of the Scotties tournament.

 

Outreach displays

In addition to the new display at YQR, there is a display case and video kiosk celebrating Saskatchewan Indigenous athletes and their achievements located in the Physical Activity Complex in the College of Kinesiology at the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon.

The SSHF also has a series of display cases featuring Regina Pats history and hockey artifacts located in the Brandt Centre in Regina.

There will be more outreach initiatives in the coming weeks and months so follow our social media channels and keep your eyes peeled around the province for more SSHF displays.

 

 

2020 Memberships are available

Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame 2020 Memberships are on sale. An SSHF membership covers admission to the Hall of Fame for an entire year and helps you stay informed about upcoming exhibits, events and programs that we have in store for 2020. Your membership also supports the work the SSHF does in maintaining, celebrating and sharing Saskatchewan’s rich sport history throughout the province.

Choose the membership category that is right for you: 

· Individual $35

· Family $50

· Provincial Sport Governing Body $60

· Corporate $100 

For a complete list of member benefits, please click here

 

Save The Date:

February 13 – Saskatoon President’s Reception, 5 p.m., Western Development Museum (2610 Lorne Ave., Saskatoon)

April 24 – Regina President’s Reception, 5 p.m., Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

May 7 – Wine Evening at Homestead Bar à Vin, 6 p.m., 338 C University Park Dr., Regina

May 7 – 2020 Induction Class Announcement, 11 a.m., Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

May 28 – SSHF Annual General Meeting, 7 p.m., Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame

  

Hours of Operation

Administrative Office Hours:

Monday – Friday 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Travelling program teaching students to Never Give Up

Never Give Up began as a “one time only” program nine years ago.
Once again this spring, the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame is bringing our Never Give Up educational program to students and schools in the province.

Students tour the mobile exhibit trailer.

When Never Give Up debuted in 2011, the program targeted students in Grades 3-5 in support of the Saskatchewan Social Studies curriculum based on the objectives of community, our province, and heroes.
The program sought to answer the question: what makes a person a “hero”? When talking about the concept of a hero, the program strove to make the students understand that there are positive role models that could be heroes in our schools, at home, and in the community and that heroes are different for everyone. The program also recognized the special contributions that the presenters have made to Saskatchewan athletics and our society.
Elementary school students are at an extremely impressionable age. They are entering a point in their lives where they act, think and feel on their own while developing impressions of themselves and those around them. It is important that they are provided with positive people or “heroes” who they can look up to within their own community. As such, the program was originally developed around Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Ted Jaleta, and his personal story of never giving up.

Ted Jaleta speaks to a school assembly as part of the Never Give Up program.

Jaleta’s promising distance running career was put on hold in his native Ethiopia after he was shot, imprisoned and tortured during the Ethiopian Civil War in 1976. Jaleta was able to escape and flee the country, eventually settling in Canada.
Following an extremely successful debut, the Never Give Up program was developed into one that would be offered on a regular basis to locations throughout Saskatchewan. While the involvement of Ted Jaleta has been one of the hallmarks of the program, the involvement of other sports personalities from Saskatchewan has been essential to its success. All of these individuals have overcome obstacles and hardships and truly understand what it means to “never give up” and serve as positive role models. Past participants have included Fiona Smith-Bell (hockey), Heather Kuttai (Paralympian – shooting), Fred Sasakamoose (hockey), and Kia (Buyers) Schollar (canoe/kayak). Saskatchewan is a diverse province and this diversity is well represented within the student population. With this in mind, we have always looked to choose presenters who can speak to and represent these diversities.
Since 2011 Never Give Up has reached more than 18,000 students and been expanded to involve Grades 3-8. This year the SSHF’s mobile exhibit trailer is accompanying the Never Give Up program when it visits schools. This would not be possible without the support of our sponsors Hornoi Leasing and SaskTel.
The focus of the program is directed towards youth at risk and the formative years where the need for positive role models and the overcoming of adversity is paramount. What has never changed throughout our program delivery is the use of Saskatchewan sports personalities to engage the participants and share with them their personal stories about never giving up.

2019 Summer Programming

2019 Summer Programming
Creating Active Champions

Want something to do with your children this summer? Want to learn more about your favourite Saskatchewan Sports legends? For the cost of $1 per person you and your children will get a tour of the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame, activities on our multisport simulator, adaptive curling rink, and outdoor games in Victoria Park. Plus, each participant will leave the program with an awesome surprise to help them remain active champions!

* Some restrictions apply. See below for full details.

NEW for 2019!

Monday – Friday:
For individuals and groups ages 4-12
Up to 30 participants per time slot
9:30-11 a.m.
1:30-3 p.m.

Programming runs from July 2 to August 16, 2019

Cost is $1 per person.  For ages 4-12, maximum 30 children per time slot
Adult chaperones must be present at all times

All individuals and groups must pre-register

To register please contact:

Vickie Krauss
(306) 780-9232
[email protected]

 

A special thank you to our sponsor:

 

 

POINTS TO REMEMBER:

  • Outside activities will only proceed weather permitting. During inclement weather, all activities will take place inside the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame (SSHF).
  • All group leaders/parents/guardians/chaperones must ensure the child is dressed for the weather and outfitted with sunscreen, bug spray and water bottles. Refillable water bottles are fine as we do have a water fountain available in the building.
  • Drawstring backpack’s are available while quantities last and only on first visit. Everyone will still receive a gift to help them remain active champions.
  • An adult chaperone must be present at all times with groups and individuals. We encourage their participation as well!
  • Programming fee for groups can be paid by cash, cheque or credit card. We do not have debit available at the location. Individual programming fee (i.e. $1) must be paid in cash.
  • The SSHF reserves the right to cancel the program session if a minimum of 5 participants are not enrolled.
  • Pre-registraton must occur a minimum 24 hours in advance while programming space remains available.

News Update: New Communications Coordinator

Introducing our New Communication Coordinator

Forty-five applications later we have found our new Communications Coordinator. We are thrilled to welcome Matthew Gourlie to our team.

Matthew brings with him a wealth of experience in the communications field. Having earned a BA in Journalism and Communications from the University of Regina, Matthew spent much of his career to date as a sports reporter with the Moose Jaw Times-Herald. As the face of the industry changed so did Matthew, embracing technology through website and social media applications. A sport fan himself, Matthew has had the opportunity to cover just about every sport imaginable throughout his career, and has a strong understanding of the Saskatchewan sport scene and those involved in it.

His knowledge of Saskatchewan sport will serve Matthew well especially since he has to “hit the ground running” as we announce the Class of 2019 in less than 2 weeks. We have a very busy summer and fall season planned here at the SSHF and we are look forward to having Matthew as part of our team.